,

Great American Eclipse

On Monday, August 21, 2017, a total solar eclipse will be visible in totality within a band across the entire contiguous United States; it will only be visible in other countries as a partial eclipse.[1][2] The last time a total solar eclipse was visible across the entire contiguous United States was during the June 8, 1918 eclipse.

A solar eclipse occurs when the Moon passes between Earth and the Sun, thereby totally or partly obscuring the image of the sun for a viewer on Earth. A total solar eclipse occurs when the moon’s apparent diameter is larger than the sun’s, blocking all direct sunlight, turning day into darkness. Totality occurs in a narrow path across Earth’s surface, with the partial solar eclipse visible over a surrounding region thousands of kilometers wide.

This eclipse is the 22nd of the 77 members of Saros series 145, which also produced the solar eclipse of August 11, 1999. Members of this series are increasing in duration. The longest eclipse in this series will occur on June 25, 2522 and last for 7 minutes and 12 seconds.

Mark Your Calendars – The US Will See Its First Total Solar Eclipse Since 1979

Mark Your Calendars – The US Will See Its First Total Solar Eclipse Since 1979

Amazing, Great American Eclipse
Are you ready for something that hasn't happened in America since 1979? No, we're not bringing back ultra-wide bell bottoms – we're talking about a full solar eclipse. In August 2017, the total solar eclipse will be visible to the lower 48 of the United States. And it could likely be another 40 or so years before we see another one.  
Officials In South Carolina Are Warning Citizens Of Possible Lizard Man Sightings During The Eclipse

Officials In South Carolina Are Warning Citizens Of Possible Lizard Man Sightings During The Eclipse

Amazing, Great American Eclipse
This sounds fake, but really, it is not. Authorities in South Carolina are advising citizens that it is entirely possible – and probable – that people will see the Lizard Man and/or Bigfoot during the Great American Eclipse, which happens on August 21. The total solar eclipse will bring darkness during the middle of the day – and with that comes the things that go bump in the night. Only they're going to be bumping during the day. So if you live in South Carolina and happen to see any of these creatures meandering around on August 21, take out your camera (with flash), and snap a pic for us. 
Solar eclipse of August 21, 2017

Solar eclipse of August 21, 2017

Amazing, Great American Eclipse
On Monday, August 21, 2017, a total solar eclipse will be visible in totality within a band across the entire contiguous United States; it will only be visible in other countries as a partial eclipse.The last time a total solar eclipse was visible across the entire contiguous United States was during the June 8, 1918 eclipse.    A solar eclipse occurs when the Moon passes between Earth and the Sun, thereby totally or partly obscuring the image of the sun for a viewer on Earth. A total solar eclipse occurs when the moon's apparent diameter is larger than the sun's, blocking all direct sunlight, turning day into darkness. Totality occurs in a narrow path across Earth's surface, with the partial solar eclipse visible over a surrounding region thousands of kilometers wide.      This eclipse
Solar Eclipses Can Cause Blindness – So Be Careful This Summer

Solar Eclipses Can Cause Blindness – So Be Careful This Summer

Amazing, Great American Eclipse
Solar eclipses are awesome. And hey, if you live in North America, you're in luck! In August 2017, a total solar eclipse will be in full view over parts of the US. Called the Great American Eclipse, this beauty will make its debut on August 21. And if you're interested in seeing it, make sure you bring some protective eyewear because looking at a solar eclipse with the bare eye can cause blindness.   Yes, your mother was right. Looking into the Sun too long is not good for your eyes. And a solar eclipse can cause blindness. So if you are planning on checking out the Great American Eclipse, make sure you read up on the appropriate solar eclipse eye protection. Grab your sunglasses (or a real nice piece of cardboard) and get to lookin', people.
Page generated in 0.889 seconds. Stats plugin by www.blog.ca